EDITORIAL: Agbogbloshie: Portraits at the end of E-Waste: 20151219_Fortune_Ewaste_0368

Agbogbloshie, Ghana | December 19, 2015Several young men take apart discarded printers - still filled with toner - breaking them into base components, hoping to find enough copper and aluminum to eke out a small profit in the mass dumping ground that is Agbogbloshie. A wetland suburb of Accra, the area is home to a vast dumping ground and slum that stretches as far as the eye can see. Once labeled the world's largest e-waste site - though since disputed - it is a hell on earth for poor migrant workers who toil in its toxic landscape - separating refuse from reusable metals - hoping to make a slim income to feed themselves each day.

Agbogbloshie, Ghana | December 19, 2015

Several young men take apart discarded printers - still filled with toner - breaking them into base components, hoping to find enough copper and aluminum to eke out a small profit in the mass dumping ground that is Agbogbloshie.

A wetland suburb of Accra, the area is home to a vast dumping ground and slum that stretches as far as the eye can see.

Once labeled the world's largest e-waste site - though since disputed - it is a hell on earth for poor migrant workers who toil in its toxic landscape - separating refuse from reusable metals - hoping to make a slim income to feed themselves each day.