EDITORIAL: Agbogbloshie: Portraits at the end of E-Waste: 20151219_Fortune_Ewaste_1159b

benlowyAgbogbloshie, Ghana | December 19, 2015Yakub, 17, carries a jumble of computer wires, a few alternators and several automobile starters in a makeshift bowl on his head. All these parts are destined to the Agbogbloshie burn sites, where young men - almost all internal migrants from Ghana's northern Tamale region - toil in toxic smoke, burning down manufactured parts into their basic copper components. A wetland suburb of Accra, Agbogbloshie is home to a vast dumping ground - once labeled the world's largest e-waste site - that covers an unstable swamp, the garbage and soot a carpet that sways with every step, sometimes swallowing new migrants who arrived hoping to make a slim income to feed themselves each day.

benlowyAgbogbloshie, Ghana | December 19, 2015

Yakub, 17, carries a jumble of computer wires, a few alternators and several automobile starters in a makeshift bowl on his head. All these parts are destined to the Agbogbloshie burn sites, where young men - almost all internal migrants from Ghana's northern Tamale region - toil in toxic smoke, burning down manufactured parts into their basic copper components.

A wetland suburb of Accra, Agbogbloshie is home to a vast dumping ground - once labeled the world's largest e-waste site - that covers an unstable swamp, the garbage and soot a carpet that sways with every step, sometimes swallowing new migrants who arrived hoping to make a slim income to feed themselves each day.