RECENT WORK: Swimming with Great White Sharks: GWS_0006

Isla Guadalupe, Mexico - November 11, 2015: A female great white shark inspects a piece of hanging bait as she swims past several dive cages. In other dive locations around the world, many tour operators {quote}chum{quote} the water, spilling blood and fresh food into the sea, hoping to start a shark feeding frenzy. Most if not all of the operators working within the waters of Isla Guadalupe have taken a different tack. As the eco-tourism market has grown, so has the goal of not habituating sharks to human presence. While tourists and divers want to get close to the great white, the goal is not to have the sharks see people and each boat as a source of food. That could lead to dangerous incidents. Rather the frozen tuna {quote}bait{quote} is merely hung, enticing the shark's interest and curiosity, but not enough to feed these massive predators. (Photograph by Benjamin Lowy for The New York Times)

Isla Guadalupe, Mexico - November 11, 2015: A female great white shark inspects a piece of hanging bait as she swims past several dive cages. In other dive locations around the world, many tour operators "chum" the water, spilling blood and fresh food into the sea, hoping to start a shark feeding frenzy. Most if not all of the operators working within the waters of Isla Guadalupe have taken a different tack. As the eco-tourism market has grown, so has the goal of not habituating sharks to human presence. While tourists and divers want to get close to the great white, the goal is not to have the sharks see people and each boat as a source of food. That could lead to dangerous incidents. Rather the frozen tuna "bait" is merely hung, enticing the shark's interest and curiosity, but not enough to feed these massive predators. (Photograph by Benjamin Lowy for The New York Times)